What’s up today?

6 Likes
2 Likes

Teaming up with Facebook and Google… mmmm :thinking:

2 Likes

Maybe time to finally make the change to ipv6. I have read that the change from ipv4 to ipv6 has been going on for ages

1 Like

Really interesting philosophical interview about data, freedom, automation, blockchain, the future, etc. IMO, he essentially defines SAFENetwork as what is needed to move things to the next level. Well worth a listen!

Eric Weinstein is the chap being interviewed.

Listen to LTB #418 Statechains, and Trading the Panopticon for Magical Internet Money by Let’s Talk Bitcoin! on #SoundCloud

2 Likes
3 Likes
3 Likes

Richard Heart destroys Tone Vays…

1 Like
3 Likes
10 Likes
3 Likes

#tethics
(Silicon Valley TV show reference)

1 Like

That’s being ‘Code Of Conduct King’-Y?

For developers, and a thought for something interesting to try and build on SAFE. Check out the one minute video - echos of Google Wave:

3 Likes
2 Likes

What did the people who would’ve be living next to that thing felt about it though?

That is all what matters.

It’s easy and cheap to have strong opinions about stuff one isn’t affected by. Should we allow such opinions matter more than those with a stake in it? I mean, we often do and look where we got…

2 Likes

This is actually a good point. But I don’t think anyone really cared (about their opinion).

I do have an IPv6 address but guess what, my ISP filters incoming connections to it. Things work fine through my IPv4 address but that one isn’t static anymore (don’t ask why but I used to have the same address for years without ever subscribing to a fixed address).

1 Like

Exactly my point. We’re doing governance wrong almost everywhere.

1 Like

That’s a bit radical. We need both. Technology does matter but here are two simple examples for when we need strong laws to protect us from corporations:

  • Net neutrality, that is, disallowing ISPs to discriminate between packets. P2P traffic can be throttled easily by keeping a list of IP ranges allocated to retail customers and then limit the aggregate bandwidth for that range.
  • Laws that protect our rights to build mesh networks. It isn’t enough that they are not outlawed. A lobby group can easily push through regulation to outlaw reasonable frequency ranges under some seemingly unrelated pretense, for example.
2 Likes