Someone Is Learning How to Take Down the Internet

This is a really interesting article that I thought some of you may like to read.

To the devs/other technically minded individuals. How would the Safe Network mitigate such an attack,or would these types of attacks simply not hurt the network?

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No centralised / owned DNS as with SAFE is a large help here. Self healing properties of kademlia like networks also helps an awful lot (like having a network full of hot-standby machines).

Of course the downside is that it’s harder for us folks to pull a fully working secured autonomous p2p network together :slight_smile: As if nobody noticed :smiley:

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No centralised / owned DNS as with SAFE is a large help here. Self healing properties of kademlia like networks also helps an awful lot (like having a network full of hot-standby machines)

Yeh, I figured that the network would stand up to this type of attack given the fact that there are no servers to attack and Safe’s DNS works in a different way.

Thank you for replying though David, as it’s good to get a reassurance from the person who would actually know for certain.

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The MaidSafe DNS is not physically centralized nor centrally curated which would thwart the ddos attacks mention in the articles, true. But it is a cononical record, which leaves it vulnerable to different types of manipulation by other actors.

So while these types of attack are not feasible, other more subtle forms of malevolence - typo squatting, rent-seeking behavior, etc - are not addressed by the current implementation.

http://www.hpl.hp.com/techreports/2005/HPL-2005-148.html

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True it does open other attack vectors, but wouldn’t squatting / rent seeking be mitigated by widespread use of pet-naming systems?

Like, if one circle of site nicknames becomes taken over by bots / too much squatting, people could easily create & share new DNS webs / lists of site nicknames?

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You know it! Actually the link above was Marc Stigler’s paper on the subject.

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