MaidSafe Dev Update :safe: 29 July 2015

Installers are being worked on at the moment (sorry I know you have been told this before) and we are looking to deliver these at the end of the sprint. This is getting a lot of focus internally as this will make running the network much more inclusive which is what we are all about after all.

I think you are taking this from the action items against @ioptio in the Google doc? These are actually 2 separate issues. Paige is teaching herself Rust and is also working on some developer outreach items.

I’m not sure on this point yet. Current priority is completing the sprint and getting desktop installers released. Mobile is going to be really important for us so we will get to this, I’m just not sure when yet.

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Okay so in a few weeks at the end of the sprint we’ll have installers. Awesome. Thanks. I’m just kind of excited and want my maidsafe. :smile:

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Yeah no probs, me too. It should be less than that, the sprint is due to finish Fri 7th of August

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Okay this might sound like a stupid question but once we HAVE our installers what exactly will we be able to install with them? I mean will we have a client and some kind of interface? Do they come with Lifestuff? Do we just have raw maidsafe and have to use a commandline to farm safecoin? What are we working with here?

Currently the plan is to have installers for the vault binary itself and also a separate installer for the examples(this would have examples from the various rust modules). @Fraser is setting up the JIRA tasks for the same. Do note work is currently ongoing for these ones and you should be able to track these via JIRA too. This filter should show you the tasks as they’re getting added.

Also worth noting that this is not “all the installers” we’re going to be releasing. These will evolve as more apps/features become relevant as part of the sprint work.

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I’m on Fedora / Win 7, I despise Windows 8 and after reading about Win 10 there’s no chance in hell I’d use it. Is there a Win 7 version of SAFE?

Definitely :smile: . Well considering all the binaries we’ve got right now are console based, there really shouldn’t be much effort in supporting everything above Win-7.

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No problem, so the messages can be - in a sense - divided in two categories: requests and responses. When e.g. you send a request to the network, it travels through different nodes until it finally reaches it’s destination, let’s call it node B. If everything is OK, the node B sends you back a response which again travels through different nodes till it reaches you. Now we have two problems:

a) what if someone other than the node B tries to send you a response? This one is solved with the sentinel.
b) how do you know that a response you receive is something that you requested? The current solution to this problem we have is that the response comes back together with the signed request, and since we were the ones who signed it, we can easily make sure we were the requesters.

For example clients. Clients are those who don’t store data nor control the network, that is, they just query data or request the network (nodes inside the XOR space) to store data in it.

Another example are Nodes that did not find their place in the network yet. That is, when a node starts, it needs to connect to other nodes that are as close to it as possible using the XOR distance (only then it is considered to be “inside” the XOR space), but before it does so, it needs to find its peers. This searching for peers is done with help from the nodes in the XOR space.

You’re welcome :), let me know if you have more questions or if you’d like me to further elaborate.

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So the original message is the request. I gather then it is small. Is that correct?

I understand the request-response issues, having written some protocols myself in decades past (-x

Silly me, I should have realised it is the clients. Interesting about the nodes joining network.

Thanks again.

This is a part I still don’t fully get. Even after watching @dirvine explaining it on video. Let’s say I’m connected in CRUST. That’s only ip. So now I need to find close nodes, and in the video it’s stated that I send a very big number of requests to the network in the hope that some XOR-group will reply (even a million requests??) But at the same time I can’t “choose” my own XOR-address. It’s given to me by the network isn’t it? How does that part work. Am I just looking for a group that replies to me saying; “hey, we are 31 in size, we have an open spot, this will be your address”?? Or do I already have created my own address? In that case I could “target” a group in the hope to join, which shouldn’t be possible.

@neo not silly to me. I didn’t even think to ask those questions, and the answers are very enlightening. Thanks. And thanks @Peter_Jankuliak for explaining - very clearly.

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It depends from case to case, e.g. for GET messages, the requests are quite small. Then for PUT messages they may be larger, but we get responses only on errors. I understand your concern though, that is, not to increase BW if it’s not necessary. We’re also playing with the idea that instead of signing the serialized message, we would sign a SHA512 digest of the message. There are pros and cons, so this will be carefully reviewed once we start optimizing.

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EXCITEMENT INCOMING VAULT INSTALLERS :exclamation:

jiraBOT [2:39 AM]
Fraser Hutchison created Task MAID-1275
Summary

Vault Installer for 64-bit Windows 8

Priority

Major

jiraBOT [2:42 AM]
Fraser Hutchison created Task MAID-1276
Summary

Vault Installer for 32-bit Windows 8

Priority

Major

jiraBOT [2:57 AM]
Fraser Hutchison created Task MAID-1277
Summary

Vault Installer for 64-bit Linux

Priority

Major

jiraBOT [3:01 AM]
Fraser Hutchison created Task MAID-1278
Summary

Vault Installer for 32-bit Linux

Priority

Major

jiraBOT [3:13 AM]
Fraser Hutchison created Task MAID-1279
Summary

Vault Installer for OS X

Priority

Major

jiraBOT [3:52 AM]
Viv Rajkumar completed New Feature MAID-1266

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ARM ARM ARM ARM ARM ARM

Just sayin’ :wink:

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I hear ye just need to make sure @Fraser and @Ross do as well :wink:

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Definitely not this, on a well populated network there can be no group smaller than 32, the next closest one always takes the spot if someone leaves, by definition.

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Quite logical actually, but I still don’t get the part where a node goes from CRUST to XOR. And is given an address.

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@polpolrene Keep asking these questions, I too could do with these step by step explanations.
Thanks everyone for your patience with the answers.

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It has an address, to give it to the network.
The network then says OK we will alter this and get back to you.
Then the group you gave it to, relocates the address and tells you what it is.
Then you do a find_group to the new address
Then connect_request to each member of the group, that is now your closest group.

The last point is where you transition from IP to XOR space really.

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Ahh, that’s how the network prevents you target a group :slight_smile: Thanx for the explanation.

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