Freelance Job Sites

Does anyone here earn an income on freelance job sites? Any recommendations?

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I used to frequently, & also hired with them.

Elance.com was the best but it has since been bought out by upwork.com which is now the best. It really is a great platform though, and it’s the one I always recommend.

Still working to get @we_advance Mr. Coomber to use it for getting small parts of n99 done :slight_smile:

There’s also Odesk.com and freelance.com, but they’re both clunkier and more expensive, as I remember

EDIT: Scratch that, Upwork also bought Odesk. So it looks the only real alternative is Freelance.com

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Thanks, that confirms my own survey.

I found an excellent video course covering all the basics for getting hired at upwork.com, by a professional announcer/voice-over/podcaster. It is called “Upwork Guide to Becoming a Freelance Superstar”. And as it happens, there is a live torrent of it here: https://torrentproject.se/torrent/18DE420295C71D00C1719DBF54E8D00AD25E86A7.torrent Someone is seeding it at a good speed (not me).

While browsing upwork.com, out of curiosity I searched on “Rust” and found exactly one job that mentions it, and two freelancers who mention it. Hmm.

TL:DR of the course I reference above:

  1. A portfolio of past projects, favorable reviews, promptness, and professional presentation are as important as in the conventional employment worlld. This is where you might have a natural advantage compared to some third-worlder willing to work for pennies, so you might as well play it to the hilt.

  2. The bigger money comes from building depth of skill and experience in an in-demand area. You then acquire a higher rating and hirers will often come to you without your needing to make proposals on jobs.

  3. Smaller, fixed-rate jobs are worth doing in order to build a portfolio, even the ones where the amount to be paid is not worth the attention of a more established freelancer.

The search tools on the site are not brilliant, and the site is a bit slow to browse, so I use a hack of pasting likely tags into the URL, like this:

https://www.upwork.com/o/jobs/browse/skill/linux-system-administration/ (348 results)

https://www.upwork.com/o/jobs/browse/skill/python/ (573 results)

https://www.upwork.com/o/jobs/browse/skill/go-programming-language/ (13 results)

https://www.upwork.com/o/jobs/browse/skill/golang/ (27 results)

When you’re signed up you can get an rss feed of the tags you want.

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The Upwork profile has a space for certifications. I find it a little frustrating that I really would benefit from filling that in, but my credentials are not much related to my current work interests (in which I’m quite strong but self-taught). It’s a sad fact that prospective employers, confronted with a pile of resumes/profiles will look for what is missing (such as a blank certification field) in order to winnow the pile down to a short-list.

I realize that if you get to the short-list then credentials are not important, and your prior projects/portfolio becomes most important.

I looked around, for example on the subjects of Linux system administration and Linux engineering, and what I found was that the Linux Foundation does indeed hold such exams but at $300 each (ack!) I don’t think so…

Anyone have any ideas on gathering official-looking credentials in areas that you already know well enough to just go and sit their exam?

EDIT: Hmm, Comptia are the best known general testers but I’d be looking at two exams for a total of just under $400: https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/linux Oh dear.

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