Deep Packet Inspection now coming from carriers

Just thought this was relevant, now mobile carriers are planning on trying to extort google by blocking ads delivered across their networks. To do so they will need to do deep packet inspection. This means as a by product they get to scoup up all that yummy data. And its in the hands of some really corrupt ****wits like this guy (Dennis O Brien):

Heres details of the process.

And people were afraid of the great Chinese firewall. Ha. Roll on permanent encryption.

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I am not too concerned about the relationship of my carrier & Google. In fact I wouldn’t mind to enjoy a lower price (or faster performance, if Google refuses to pay up), but it’s not a big deal.

Okay, so that aside, why should I give a crap? I read the both article and I see nothing I care about.
What’s there to be afraid or concerned about? The second article subtitle says the carries don’t want to use that tech for our protection, but to mess with Google. Why should I care?

Serendipitous collection of data, I guess the worry which is glaringly obvious is that they wont just use it for its stated goal. Im mean no one else has, have they?

To me it seems open to abuse. What carriers say and what they do has already been proven to be different things (.i.e. we want to sell you access to the internet - theres a hidden clause, we are giving your data to the NSA wholesale)

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All carriers already have “NSA” (or whatever state agency) equipment installed, and all traffic already goes through their networks (firewalls, etc.). I don’t think this makes it worse (but if they stop Google ads, great).
I wish they could also stop JavaScripts like these (in source of safenetforum.org)
https://www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js

But as you can see, everything that one normally runs is already encrypted (Webmail, forums, etc.) and even these Google Analytics scripts are served over HTTPS, so they how are they going to do “more” surveillance?

It seems network neutrality fanatics are trying to create outrage.

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The issue is carriers need to be dumb pipes period. We had to be out of our mind to let them on the basis of their private naturally corrupt profit motives ever have even the smallest say in what traverses a network that we as the public paid for through their jacked up rates. Common carrier made so much sense. In the states we need to go ahead and nationalize these parasites and their profit claims out of the picture. Their local monopoly status should have relegated them to municipalities with profit limits or no profit or non profit status. Investment return here is irrelevant, what matters is speech and price performance, these firms are less efficient and effective than straight state based stuff would but that is not surprising given that they don’t really compete but instead collude. This whole thing was about trying to keep the money filter alive to keep puppet media in place to allow money puppets to continue to contaminate society with phony rules and laws all designed to undermine the public interest with endless conflicts of interest.

We don’t have content relationships with carriers and unless we want to get rid of the internet and replace it with modal ad filled TV and sponsorship/censorship we never will. Although its great to block ads (because their most important function is to enable sponsor censorship) the idea that phone or cable companies have any say so at all is ludicrous, and especially not on the basis of their useless and unnecessary profit.

The issue can be solved by canceling laws related to telecom services.
Then you and few million people like you will attract either community or other capital and some greedy investor will create a company that caters to customers like you.
We already discussed this topic and despite having 150% confidence in mesh networks and whatnot, you are against doing this because you want to have it both ways (regulation and taxation for investors, free shit for consumers).

I don’t want regulation for mesh nets and I do want to liquidate traditional spectrum. I think cut the cord on any kind of network bill or investment aside from buying our own hardware with mesh back channel enabled if we do it right.