Capitalism is Parasitism

I personally think Capitalism is dead. For me its defining characteristic is having the majority of people working for owners. This is going to end.

In the rising coop economy there are two principles that should hold. People should refuse increasingly to buy from corporations and refuse to work for corporations until that choice is complete and absolute and the corporations are a banished form of organization. If an organization has a management its a clue that its not a democratic organization and therefore not good enough, its still corporate.

When we stop buying from and working for incumbent corporate wealth it fails and disappears along with its power.

It’s by no means over. Capitalism’s main characteristic is that everyone is free to use their property (including labor) to increase their wealth.

What you may be seeing is the rise of informal sole proprietorships. People may be operating a virtual or even unregistered business. That’s perfectly fine and free market capitalists like this development.

As a free market guy, I don’t care where they buy their supplies. Those who don’t buy them where it makes most sense won’t be successful. “Management” is just semantics. If you are the single employee of your little company (and therefore don’t have a manager), you’re the manager.

Edit: corrected typos.

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Co-ops and Corporations do not behave much different from one another.

The market doesn’t allow it.

Wealth demands to be preserved and it makes very little difference who holds the wealth or what organizational format they use to manage that wealth…

Warren can build his romantic fictional fantasy, but it will remain such.

Most of what he says is sourced directly out of his head.

Think whatever you want, but your unsourced opinion isn’t going to convince anyone who has seen both types of entities competing in the marketplace together. Both have advantages and disadvantages, both can be ruthless. And run in a “lets make everyone equal” manner, both will lead a lot of people to unemployment lines. (Everyone is pretty equal there).

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Don’t confuse corporatism with capitalism. Corporations get large and powerful because they rely on the force of government to work against natural market forces that would allow real competition and innovation – they only “succeed” because the competition is kept in check. Sometimes that government force is as simple as making the cost of entry into the marketplace inhibitive due to regulation, but it can be outright protection of a monopoly as well.

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Cooperatives have the same incentive to lobby government and protect their incumbency.

Co-ops are far from the cure all that Warren dreams that they are.

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Old style coop vs newer ideas. Chomsky: we’ve never had true capitalism and never will, it would collapse in five minutes.

Newer ideas?

Why haven’t the “new ideas” been tried before? There is nothing new under the sun.

We are not more brilliant than generations before – Probably the opposite in most cases. We do have some a few better tools.

I hit on the core problem, which you seem to ignore. Wealth demands to be preserved no matter who owns it or what quantity they own. In fact, a guy with a net worth of 100k is going to be even more demanding of the preservation of wealth than a guy of 10M… He is going to be risk adverse, and companies where he has significant influence are not likely to evolve to meet the demands a changing market.

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True, but I’m guessing @Warren was making a distinction more like Walmart vs your neighborhood food pantry. To me, the difference is really rooted in the motivations – i.e “there’s a sucker born every minute” vs “the Lord helps those who help themselves”.

I don’t see “there is a sucker born every minute” as being Walmart’s business model.

Generally, they sell quality products. (The same products as anyone else) They do have economies of scale working on their side to reduce costs - and they have a massive laboratory to identify the factors that make products sell and have the clout to make the suppliers comply with demands for packaging that moves product. Customers want and often need inexpensive products…

The Waltons where a Mom and Pop shop once too. The motive of all business is to invest in being able to best satisfy customer needs.

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Walmart used to listen to the customer. A granny would whisper and 10000 silver spoon ivy leaguers would get pushed around. But the pigs whined so Walmart raised its prices and it doesn’t reallt listen any more. But it was the bottom up element that made it. It will fail now that its becoming another fat stupid centralized monopoly. McDonalds is struggling oil profits are down wit citibank calling carbon energy a bad investment. Capitalism is dying. Just like local governments don’t like grant money from on high with strings people are tied of the strings attachef to their money like having to put up with a boss and then having to drink to self medicate awsy the shame of it.

You assume Granny knows better than the posse of psychologist and market analysts that Walmart has on staff…

Probably not. They listen - but they listen with better tools…

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The idea that we pay people to control other people has to end.

Who is being controlled? How? Nobody is forced to go into any store, let alone buy anything there.

Everyone goes there of their own free will because for the most part the prices are better than any competitor…

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Its the idea of management and its at the heart of capitalism and it has to end. People being paid to control other people is wrong and has to end.

It is already established that the trend is toward freelancing and “single employee companies”. The number of managers will therefore increase because a lot more employees will become one.
Secondly, there’s no work without management. Even smallest two person family businesses in the third world divide duties responsibilities (eg finance and production/sales) because without specialization anything complex cannot be done as efficiently.

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Why? Because you don’t like it? Good luck with that. Management is needed to innovate and run anything effectively. Your effort to ban management is going to require a massive amount of management to pull off. In short it is oxymoronic ridiculousness. Your suggestions are all include “controlling people” that do things that you don’t like.

Like I said before (And you failed to answer) Nobody is being controlled by anybody. You don’t have to work for anyone you don’t want to work for. You don’t have to buy things you don’t want to buy (Unless Obama makes you)

In other words. Whatever…

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Who doesn’t believe in freedom now and who is the tyrrant?

I believe in freedom. Including the opportunity to work for a successfully lead company…

You are the one trying to ban things. Mainly leadership structures.

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I guess that read differently than I intended. That wasn’t supposed to be a direct slight of Walmart.

Motivations run along a spectrum. One end is to simply extract money from others (purely selfish), while the other end is to help one’s self by working with others (mutual benefit). What shifts along that spectrum is how you view those folks that you deal with. The type of organization you create to do that is not the problem.

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In a free market one cannot “simply” extract money from anyone. If it were possible everyone would be for free market (and rich). You need to provide a good or service that the person who is buying values it more than the money it costs to acquire. That is not easy.

Which is why most voters prefer a redistributionist and non-free system, thinking they’ll scam out their fellow citizen either directly or with the help of the State.

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