Australian researchers make quantum computing breakthrough, paving way for world-first chip

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They say that with the right industry partner we could have the first quantum processor chip (meaning consumer) in five years. I am guessing that partner will be Intel and a hundred others.

I saw something recently that said over the last 3 decades Moores law is actually every 13 months not every 18 months.

This news comes as classic chip making is about to hit the ceiling. As I understand it classic chip making only has a few generations left before it reaches the physical limits of silicon transistors.
When this becomes a reality, doesn’t it put the bitcoin block chain in jeopardy? Not to mention every other computer security system linked to the net. Exciting to see its uses going forward.
I think I read a post a while back where David Irvine mentioned that there are ways to harden the Safenetwork against quantum computing attacks. I’d love to hear more about that.

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Na, it just means that we have to learn qubits, and build a new programming language around qubits. The blockchain idea is still there, as well as safenet. It just needs to be reimplemented, and improvised for better. It would be in jeopardy when the code exist to exploit the sha256 and blockchain.

We’ll get much better encryption with qubits, we just don’t know how. That takes time too.

NO the quote is

[quote]Professor Dzurak is “confident” that with the right industry partnership
a prototype quantum computing chip could arrive within five years, with
the first commercial application likely to be in large-scale data
centres.[/quote]

Note the word “confident” in other words uncertain.

Prototype perhaps in 5 years

First commercial use in large-scale data centres.

NOT consumer in 5 years. Who knows how long it will take to go from the “for the first silicon quantum computing chip — which will still need to house hundreds of transistors” prototype to a working CPU chip that can be commercialized.

You have to realise there is world of development to go from 2 transistors being electrically connected to “this is to working logic that utilities the power of quantum computing”. It is likely to take a lot more than 5 years to have a suitable prototype. And many more years to have a commercial chip

Then again maybe the money might of the NSA could speed this up :smile:

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You’re right, sorry I meant to put a question mark, but could have simply read it again.

Given Dwave which looks to be chip based but probably not silicone, Id be concerned the NSA already has it.

The article does a bad job at making clear that quantum computers would only be faster when solving very particular problems. Quantum computers aren’t going to replace our current “classical” computers. There’s no sense in running for example a SAFE client or vault on a quantum computer.

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Well the actual fear I guess is that whatever security measures we put in through cryptography today will become breakable by owners of quantum computers… That’s a fear we’ll need to learn to live with

I’be heard there is some NP equivalece theorem or set of math problem that if some one can solve/prove will open the full range of general purpose problems to quantum machines.

Does anyone know estimate of power efficiency of these chip systems.

@catbert people seem to think its addressable at least in a system like SAFE. But Id be concerned the NSA already having a working useful quantum computer as their mission statement is practically: exclusive secret access or private secret back door. But also compromised by the stupidity of their trust in money through private contractors like hacker team and using off the shelf Chinese hardware to spy on the Chinese. So being hacked almost by design their back door keys may be spread around.

Don’t laugh. With the secrets that the government likes to keep, I wouldn’t be surprised to hear of the government having legit quantum chips sooner than Dzurak’s predicting. IIRC, the government already has pseudo-kinda quantum computing available to use. If I was David Irvine or a bitcoin developer, I know I wouldn’t feel comfortable shipping code that wasn’t built to withstand attacks from quantum computers.

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That’s a good point, but I’d be surprised if it were lost on the SAFE crew that they need to do it as soon as they can. It apparently has somethings in that would slow down such an attack but David has commented several times on other possibilities. But there was another post on here about a massive increase in an area of math that normally takes millennia to update as if there were a radical human machine partnership attack on prime numbers etc. So people like David are looking at approaches not vulnerable to prime number attacks and if I remember there was at least one good candidate