A gifting economy on SAFE

@Blindsite2k introduced me to the concept of a gifting economy. Could one be done on SAFE?

I still don’t know what it is formally but my guess is something like this:
“A gifting economy. Using money to free people from money in a chain reaction. A billionaire gifts a working person 10 million dollars on the condition that they quit work and use half to live on and use the other half to repeat the same process for as many people as possible with the same conditions extending to each recipient.”

That is not an economy, mathematically it is reduced to zero.

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In the end. But along the way one steps out of work and starts the work of giving to others so they also can give to others and it spreads. And it puts us all out of work and makes money a lot less important along the way. When they have the five million and have to make it at least 15 million to grow hopefully they are in the process growing that money in the spirit of gifting for consistency.

I’m open to being freed from money if you’re offering. I accept MAID of course. :stuck_out_tongue:
I don’t get these free money economy ideas. If everybody gets $X, seems obvious $X wouldn’t be worth much anymore.

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Anyway, smart ass remarks aside, I think that a smart contract platform would make it easier to implement such a scheme.

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Warren, are you under 18?

Drop the insults consider the idea.

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Since when asking someone age is an insult?

Stop it Piluso. As a long standing member you should know that Warren has made his approximate age discernible in the past. He’s definitely no child. No need to play around with social dynamics for the sake of justification. Warren has always been a gentleman on this forum. I think it only fair we remain respectful towards him.

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Damn, chill, I was just trying to find an appropriate book for him.
In any case, this is a nice book to start with:
History of Economics: The Past as the Present by John Kenneth Galbraith.

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Personally I think David Graebers Debt: The First 5000 Years is a good introduction.
And to fight the silly “human nature” argument I’d recommend Mutual Aid - A Factor of Evolution by Kropotkin.

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Being a true idealist about human nature, let me chime in: it goes against basic human greed, and it’s destined to failure.

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Thinking human nature is greed is like thinking human nature is coughing when you grow up in a environment of smoke and soot.

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Let’s assume the opposite, then: selflessness, and not greed, is basic human nature. We don’t have billionaires because they already gave their wealth away in a gifting economy which naturally developed as an obvious consequence of the premise. Hmmm…

P.S. I’m in an unusually (even for me!) argumentative mood today… I’d better withdraw myself from humanity for the time being :joy_cat:

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@piluso I read Gailbraiths book on the history and origin of Money a long ago and its stayed with me. @aenemic in school I read one of Kropotkin’s books- it was one of the textbooks- wonderful stuff.

Awesome, if you have that base it will be easier to digest these two books more related to these subjects.

Economies and Cultures: Foundations of Economic Anthropology (by Richard Wilk and Lisa Cligget)

Anarchism: From Theory to Practice (by Daniel Guérin)

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@warren what happens when everyone stops working and there is no one left to provide value (good and services) to society?

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@Warren I think what you are looking for is a world where everyone is charitable. I think this is possible. I myself would give more if the government did not take %30+ of my wealth every year.

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Thats a strawman argument, your implying that people would actually stop working. Whereas in societies where basic rights have been guaranteed through means like basic income, productivity has gone up. Seems like when people have the freedom to pursue the things they want to pursue they actually do it. Who would have thought.

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Your also building a strawman. I didnt say either was human nature by itself. Both egoism and egalitarianism are human nature. How we structure society decides which one we build up upon and “make human nature”. Like the Cherokee proverb:

“It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil - he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego.” He continued, “The other is good - he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. The same fight is going on inside you - and inside every other person, too.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?”

The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.”

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